The Application Development Experiences of an Enterprise Developer

Tag: flexibility

Meta-Abstraction -- You Ain't Gonna Need It!

Posted by bsstahl on 2020-05-18 and Filed Under: development 

When we look at the abstractions in our applications, we should see a description of the capabilities of our applications, not the capabilities of the abstraction

Let’s start this discussion by looking at an example of a simple repository.

public interface IMeetingReadRepository
{
    IEnumerable<Meeting> GetMeetings(DateTime start, DateTime end);
}

It is easy to see the capability being described by this abstraction – any implementation of this interface will have the ability to load a collection of Meeting objects that occur within a given timeframe. There are still some unknown details of the implementation, but the capabilities are described reasonably well.

Now let’s look at a different implementation of the Repository pattern.

public interface IReadRepository<T>
{
    IEnumerable<T> Get(Func<T, bool> predicate);
}

We can still see that something is going to be loaded using this abstraction, we just don’t know what, and we don’t know what criteria will be used.

This 2nd implementation is a more flexible interface. That is, we can use this interface to describe many different repositories that do many different things. All we have described in this interface is that we have the ability to create something that will load an entity. In other words, we have described our abstraction but said very little about the capabilities of the application itself. In this case, we have to look at a specific implementation to see what it loads, but we still have no idea what criteria can be used to load it.

public class MeetingReadRepository : IReadRepository<Meeting>
{
    IEnumerable<Meeting> Get(Func<Meeting, bool> predicate);
}

We could extend this class with a method that specifically loads meetings by start and end date, but then that method is not on the abstraction so it cannot be used without leaking the details of the implementation to the application.  The only way to implement this pattern in a way that uses the generic interface, but still fully describes the capabilities of the application is to use both methods described above. That is, we implement the specific repository, using the generic repository – layering abstraction on top of abstraction, as shown below.

public interface IMeetingReadRepository : IReadRepository<Meeting>
{
    IEnumerable<Meeting> GetMeetings(DateTime start, DateTime end);
}

public class MeetingReadRepository : IMeetingReadRepository
{
    IEnumerable<Meeting> GetMeetings(DateTime start, DateTime end)
        => Get(m => m.Start >= start && m.Start < end)

    // TODO: Implement
    IEnumerable<Meeting> Get(Func<Meeting, bool> predicate)
        => throw new NotImplementedException();
}

Is this worth the added complexity? It seems to me that as application developers we should be concerned about describing and building our applications in the simplest, most maintainable and extensible way possible. To do so, we need seams in our applications in the form of abstractions. However, we generally do not need to build frameworks on which we build those abstractions. Framework creation is an entirely other topic with an entirely different set of concerns.

I think it is easy to see how quickly things can get overly-complex when we start building abstractions on top of our own abstractions in our applications. Using Microsoft or 3rd party frameworks is fine when appropriate, but there is generally no need to build your own frameworks, especially within your applications. In the vast majority of cases, YAGNI.

Did I miss something here? Do you have a situation where you feel it is worth it to build a framework, or even part of a framework, within your applications. Please let me know about it on Twitter @bsstahl.

Tags: abstraction apps coding practices development entity flexibility framework generics principle yagni interface 

The Value of Flexibility

Posted by bsstahl on 2019-02-14 and Filed Under: development 

Have you ever experienced that feeling you get when you need to extend an existing system and there is an extension point that is exactly what you need to build on?

For example, suppose I get a request to extend a system so that an additional action is taken whenever a new user signs-up.  The system already has an event message that is published whenever a new user signs-up that contains all of the information I need for the new functionality.  All I have to do is subscribe a new microservice to this event message, and have that service take the new action whenever it receives a message. Boom! Done.

Now think about the converse. The many situations we’ve all experienced where there is no extension point. Or maybe there is an extension mechanism in place but it isn’t quite right; perhaps an event that doesn’t fire on exactly the situation you need, or doesn’t contain the data you require for your use case and you have to build an entirely new data support mechanism to get access to the bits you need.

The cost to “go live” is only a small percentage of the lifetime total cost of ownership. – Andy Kyte for Gartner Research, 30 March 2010

There are some conflicting principles at work here, but for me, these situations expose the critical importance of flexibility and extensibility in our application architectures.  After all, maintenance and extension are the two greatest costs in a typical application’s life-cycle. I don’t want to build things that I don’t yet need because the likelihood is that I will never need them (see YAGNI). However, I don’t want to preclude myself from building things in the future by making decisions that cripple flexibility. I certainly don’t want to have to do a full system redesign ever time I get a new requirement.

For me, this leads to a principle that I like to follow:

I value Flexibility over Optimization

As with the principles described in the Agile Manifesto that this is modeled after, this does not eliminate the item on the right in favor of the item on the left, it merely states that the item on the left is valued more highly.  This makes a ton of sense to me in this case because it is much easier to scale an application by adding instances, especially in these heady days of cloud computing, than it is to modify and extend it. I cannot add a feature by adding another instance of a service, but I can certainly overcome a minor or even moderate inefficiency by doing so. Of course, there is a cost to that as well, but typically that cost is far lower, especially in the short term, than the cost of maintenance and extension.

So, how does this manifest (see what I did there?) in practical terms?

For me, it means that I allow seams in my applications that I may not have a functional use for just yet. I may not build anything on those seams, but they exist and are available for use as needed. These include:

  • Separating the tiers of my applications for loose-coupling using the Strategy and Repository patterns
  • Publishing events in event-driven systems whenever it makes sense, regardless of the number of subscriptions to that event when it is created
  • Including all significant data in event messages rather than just keys

There are, of course, dangers here as well. It can be easy to fire events whenever we would generally issue a logging message.  Events should be limited to those in the problem domain (Domain Events), not application events. We can also reach a level of absurdity with the weight of each message. As with all things, a balance needs to be struck. In determining that balance, I value Flexibility over Optimization whenever it is reasonable and possible to do so.

Do you feel differently? If so, let me know on Twitter @bsstahl.

Tags: abstraction agile coding practices microservices optimization pattern principle flexibility yagni event driven 

About the Author

Barry S. Stahl Barry S. Stahl (him/his) - Barry is a .NET Software Engineer who has been creating business solutions for enterprise customers for more than 30 years. Barry is also an Election Integrity Activist, baseball and hockey fan, husband of one genius and father of another, and a 30+ year resident of Phoenix Arizona USA. When Barry is not traveling around the world to speak at Conferences, Code Camps and User Groups or to participate in GiveCamp events, he spends his days as a Solution Architect for Carvana in Tempe AZ and his nights thinking about the next AZGiveCamp event where software creators come together to build websites and apps for some great non-profit organizations.

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